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MailSnail Series

Starting in August of 2015, I began building a company called MailSnail with my friend and co-founder, Matt Bertino. To follow along with my personal thoughts on the ins and outs of the company, experiences, lessons learned, technical details, etc., please check out the posts below. I’ll continue to add new posts here as I publish them.

Post 1: Starting a Company
Post 2: Building a Product
Post 3: Launching a Product

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Building a Product

This is the second post in a series I’m writing about a company I’m starting up (or have started, depending on when you’re reading this). You can read other posts in the series here.
As I’ve talked about here, I’m starting a company called MailSnail. In this post, I want to share the ins and outs of how we’ve built the product (i.e. the actual web application).

The Buzzwords I’ve tried my hardest to make this post as approachable as I possibly can for anybody and everybody. I don’t want this to be something that is only interesting to folks who know what HTTP stands for or can rattle off it’s associated status codes. So for my non-tech readers, please bare with me for this one section and keep on reading.

For my fellow tech-nerds, I figured you might not care so much about the minute implementation details but rather are just more interested in a list of all of the pieces of our tech-stack (because you already know the implications of each in their use). So here’s the quick and dirty …

The Future of Education

It's always very interesting to me to see the directions that people go after college. I know several people who have degrees in Graphic Design and are now database administrators and administrative assistants. Others I know have degrees in Finance and are now Worship Pastors. An Art History major who's a full-time nanny, an Interior Design major who's a Campus Manager for a church, the list goes on an on.

This pattern could be indicative of many things. Perhaps the job market at the time didn't present any opportunities for the chosen field when graduation came. Maybe after 4 years of studying towards a degree in a particular topic, there was a realization that it really wasn't that enjoyable. However, I'm convinced that it correlates to the state of the education system. Not that it's necessarily broken, and certainly not that it's useless, but that it's due for some thoughtful reconsideration.

According to a study done by Jaison Abel and Richard Di…