Skip to main content

MailSnail Series

Starting in August of 2015, I began building a company called MailSnail with my friend and co-founder, Matt Bertino. To follow along with my personal thoughts on the ins and outs of the company, experiences, lessons learned, technical details, etc., please check out the posts below. I’ll continue to add new posts here as I publish them.

Post 1: Starting a Company
Post 2: Building a Product
Post 3: Launching a Product

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Review of the New Macbook

I finally got a chance to give the new MacBook a whirl and decided to share my thoughts about it. I very rarely feel compelled to review products or services. Like the average consumer, I typically only review things when they’re so fantastic that I think they’re a real game-changer or, conversely, when they’re so terrible that I think it’s very likely they’ll be a game-ender. Unfortunately, this review will be the latter - let’s begin:

The Big Question Admittedly, I was skeptical about the new MacBook from the get-go. Despite my skepticism, I really do like to give everything a fair chance, so I tried to keep as open of a mind as possible. Rather than focusing on any specific feature of the MacBook and making an uninformed decision about whether or not I would like it, I instead simply pondered the question “who is this designed for?” Unfortunately, after spending some time with it in person, I’m no closer to answering that question.

And that really is the big question - the only on…

Building a Product

This is the second post in a series I’m writing about a company I’m starting up (or have started, depending on when you’re reading this). You can read other posts in the series here.
As I’ve talked about here, I’m starting a company called MailSnail. In this post, I want to share the ins and outs of how we’ve built the product (i.e. the actual web application).

The Buzzwords I’ve tried my hardest to make this post as approachable as I possibly can for anybody and everybody. I don’t want this to be something that is only interesting to folks who know what HTTP stands for or can rattle off it’s associated status codes. So for my non-tech readers, please bare with me for this one section and keep on reading.

For my fellow tech-nerds, I figured you might not care so much about the minute implementation details but rather are just more interested in a list of all of the pieces of our tech-stack (because you already know the implications of each in their use). So here’s the quick and dirty …